Photo
bookishandi:

padfootstolemycrumpet:


fuckyeahteddylupin:


Same mirror - same place - different orphan by *button-bird


*strangled cry*


NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO.
 
But also YES.
 
Because for me this is a pretty important part of the final battle. A lot of folks accused JKR of just wanting to kill people off, and Lupin and Tonks were one of the major “sins” in that category. But for me, one of the major themes of her books is vicious cycle of violence, and another is the ways ordinary people can break that cycle. It’s important that we know that Harry doesn’t stop all the pain, that he’s not the last war orphan. Just like the first War, parents and adults have to make choices, choices with consequences. 
 
Like James and Lily, Lupin and Tonks didn’t risk their lives to defeat Voldemort. They gave their lives for each other, because no one person should bear the weight of the sacrifice. They gave their lives for their son, who deserved a better world. They gave their lives for love, not for victory.
 
I think it’s important to see the ways Voldemort’s evil creates these cycles, children taken from their parents and parents taken from their children, again and again. I think it’s an important sobering note in the victory—yes, this time Voldemort is really dead, but there’s another baby this time, another infant who will never know his beautiful, wonderful parents because of Voldemort and his message of hate and violence. Another child who will grow up wondering where he came from, what his parents were like, what would be different if they were alive.
 
But it’s also beautiful that Teddy will have such a different experience. And his experience will not be different because Voldemort is “really gone.” His experience will be different because his grandmother will tell him about his brilliant mom. Because Harry will tell him about his wonderful dad. Because Harry will help him deal with his pain and loss, be a sympathetic ear who understands what it’s like to grow up without your parents. Because the Weasleys will welcome him as another grandchild, and he’ll grow up with Victoire to throw dirt at, and James as a little brother. His experience won’t be different because Harry won a war, it will be different because of love.
 
That’s the whole story of Harry Potter. Sometimes we have to fight for what’s right, but what really makes life worth living and what really changes the world isn’t magic or power or moral superiority. It’s love.

bookishandi:

padfootstolemycrumpet:

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO.
 
But also YES.
 
Because for me this is a pretty important part of the final battle. A lot of folks accused JKR of just wanting to kill people off, and Lupin and Tonks were one of the major “sins” in that category. But for me, one of the major themes of her books is vicious cycle of violence, and another is the ways ordinary people can break that cycle. It’s important that we know that Harry doesn’t stop all the pain, that he’s not the last war orphan. Just like the first War, parents and adults have to make choices, choices with consequences.
 
Like James and Lily, Lupin and Tonks didn’t risk their lives to defeat Voldemort. They gave their lives for each other, because no one person should bear the weight of the sacrifice. They gave their lives for their son, who deserved a better world. They gave their lives for love, not for victory.
 
I think it’s important to see the ways Voldemort’s evil creates these cycles, children taken from their parents and parents taken from their children, again and again. I think it’s an important sobering note in the victory—yes, this time Voldemort is really dead, but there’s another baby this time, another infant who will never know his beautiful, wonderful parents because of Voldemort and his message of hate and violence. Another child who will grow up wondering where he came from, what his parents were like, what would be different if they were alive.
 
But it’s also beautiful that Teddy will have such a different experience. And his experience will not be different because Voldemort is “really gone.” His experience will be different because his grandmother will tell him about his brilliant mom. Because Harry will tell him about his wonderful dad. Because Harry will help him deal with his pain and loss, be a sympathetic ear who understands what it’s like to grow up without your parents. Because the Weasleys will welcome him as another grandchild, and he’ll grow up with Victoire to throw dirt at, and James as a little brother. His experience won’t be different because Harry won a war, it will be different because of love.
 
That’s the whole story of Harry Potter. Sometimes we have to fight for what’s right, but what really makes life worth living and what really changes the world isn’t magic or power or moral superiority. It’s love.

(via ragsies)

Quote
"They don’t believe us. Hundreds of thousands of women from around the world can weigh in and tell their first hand experiences and there are men out there — seemingly reasonable and intelligent men — who still refuse to admit that maybe, just maybe, we have good reasons to be afraid. A 22-year-old kid spouts the same misogynist rhetoric that my coworkers and I receive in our inboxes on a daily basis and goes on a shooting rampage with the expressed purpose of punishing women for not giving him the sexual attention he felt entitled to and we’re still told that we have no right to be scared because #NotAllMen are like that."

I Am Not an Angry Feminist. I’m a Furious One. (via daetrimental)

(via theappleppielifestyle)

Tags: Feminism words
Text

ostolero:

charlotteinfinityxx:

ostolero:

dogs deserve to live forever

And humans don’t?

absolutely not

(via trescas)

Tags: text post
Photo
deanshuggybear:

fozmeadows:

In which seven cats all discover the same slightly elevated flat thing and claim it as their own while pretending the other six cats don’t exist.

game of thrones

deanshuggybear:

fozmeadows:

In which seven cats all discover the same slightly elevated flat thing and claim it as their own while pretending the other six cats don’t exist.

game of thrones

(Source: misterjakes, via thecoloursyoucannotsee)

Tags: hahaha
Quote
"

Up until my second year of high school,
I allowed myself to believe that I wasn’t like other girls
as if there was something fundamentally wrong with other girls
that I had to disinherit.

I used ‘girly girl’ as an insult
like the carefully applied foundation, the long-learned eyeliner
the too-bright lipstick they nearly missed their bus to put on
made them less.

Unlearning was a slow process that I’m still slogging through.
I catch myself raising my eyebrows at a girl on the other side of the room
and have to make myself remember it doesn’t mean shit.
Femininity is not a synonym with stupid or frivolous or weak;
I’ve seen girls who can shiv with a high-heel and look great doing it
or they can sweat and grunt and spit and not give a damn either way.

Your worth is not a win-or-lose depending on if your skirt goes below your knees.

Whether makeup or a bare face or fake eyelashes so heavy you have to squint
a long dress or inch-long skirt or jeans that rip at the knee or shorts that flash your underwear
dreadlocks or metal ear-stretchers or leggings without pants or bedazzled neon nails
bikini or burqa or hair shaved in strips or long plaid shirts
a hoodie that needed washing three weeks ago or dangling earrings or worn out sneakers
a scarf to hide your adam’s apple or sunglasses that cover half your face
braces or glasses or pigtails or a jagged pink mohawk or eighteen clearly visible tattoos-

Wear it as battle armour.

"

— 'You'll Get Shit For It Anyway,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

Quote
"

When they tell you to be small,
grow.
Be big.
Sprawl over the seats, push your knees out like girls are taught not to.
Eat whatever and refuse to make the magazines get you guilty over it.
Revel in the thickness of your thighs, your body
which has never been anything but yours.

When they tell you to slow down,
speed.
Rev your damn engine.
Make your way past them and flash a middle finger as you do.
If anyone accuses you of being subordinate
because of your gender, your skin, your identity,
Show them every single reason they’re wrong.

When they tell to be quiet,
yell.
Be loud.
Your opinion will be smirked at, frowned at or dismissed entirely
and it’s your job to tell them to go fuck themselves.
Only apologize for what you think you should be sorry for,
not what they tell you you should be sorry about.

When they tell you to calm down,
get angry.
You have every right to it.

"

— 'Make Them Nervous,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

Quote
"

A co-worker closed the door to the staff room behind him.
It locked automatically
and I started planning what I could use as a weapon:
smash the glass beside the fridge into his eye.
pick up the fork next to me and sink it into his leg.
claw him across the face if I couldn’t get to anything in time.
As I calculated how hard it would be to shove his body weight off of me,
he finished making his lunch, said, “Sup,” and left,
the door automatically locking behind him.
I expect if I told him I was prepared to stab him with the corner of my staff ID if I had to,
he would say what I’ve heard too often, the one we all know
but are getting wearily suspicious of:
Not all men are like That.

When I was eleven, all the girls in my class got sent to self-defence
because they assumed we’d need it one day.
When I was twelve, there was a prostitute’s body dumped in the river next to my house
because someone thought she was disposable.
When I was thirteen, it happened again and this time the man went to jail
and people stood outside the courtroom and held up signs that he did the right thing.
When I was fourteen, my friend showed up to a sleepover late, chest heaving from sobbing
and from running four blocks after getting chased by a man that followed her off the bus.
When I was fifteen, my mother accused me of being a Man Hater
and I said, “No, but god, would you blame me if I was?”

I got catcalled and then got laughed at when I flipped them off.
they pulled up beside me and I clutched my bag tighter,
my hand going in for my keys and my mind going over how their noses would look
if I smashed them in with my elbow.
“What’s the big deal,” the guy at the steering wheel asked. “We’re just complimenting you. We’re not like That.”

Sorry, but I’m not going to trust you in case I end up on a poster labelled ‘MISSING.’
Even if you seem like the nicest guy, I’ll still have one hand holding my keys
as the only knife I’m allowed, because I don’t know how far you’re going to take it:
if you won’t back off when I tell you I don’t want to date you
if you’ll shout BITCH at me when I don’t respond well to your catcall
if you’ll expect my body as a reward for treating me like a human being
if you’ll try to take what you think you’re owed by being a man
if you’ll turn me into another statistic that people shudder away from.

I have been trained to assume that it’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing
or face the consequences.
I don’t know if you’ll nod when I reject you
or pump me full of bullets.

Every single woman I’ve talked to has a story where they haven’t felt safe in their own body
because of what a man said or did.

Not all men are like That, but god, it’s enough.

"

— 'Welcome to Girlhood: None Of Us Are Safe,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

Tags: Poetry words
Photo

(Source: italdred, via mutualize)

Tags: Photography
Quote
"

i.
fear your twenties with the kind of religious fervour
you used to save for the monsters under your bed,
the ones with big teeth that caught on your feet
no matter how hard you ran to the safety of the sheets.

ii.
your parents paid less than a third of what you’ll have to pay
if you decide to live in a dorm with the other students who laugh about being broke
while counting up their rent money with shaking hands
and realizing they’re short, again.
you listen to your parents lecture you about the importance of education
and worry distantly for the future generations, wondering how they’ll cope
when yours is already screwed so bad you’ll never be able to retire.

iii.
listen to everyone who was alive in the seventies tell you how worth it university is.
doubt.

iv.
listen to every 26 year old who graduated university several years ago
and is still living off noodles and hand-outs.

v.
you want to learn until you feel like you felt when you first started school,
like the world isn’t empty enough for all you have to put in it,
but the feeling vanishes when you see the bill for the course that made you feel on fire
and you realize you’ll have to work every weekend of your shitty job for the rest of your life
staring up at the badly-lit ceiling for you to pay off the tens of thousand of dollars
of student loans.

vi.
the words that you aced on on your weekly spelling test
when you were twelve
don’t make sense to you anymore:
words like ‘future’ and ‘career’ and ‘relationships.’
they have meanings that you can’t find in the dictionary
except ‘dread.’

vii.
you want to stay in your bed and see if you can make yourself have the same dream twice in a row.
you want to leave, to step out on the platform of eighteen different airports in eighteen different countries.
you want to kiss until your lips sting that way you’ve heard about, want to do everything the people on the television are doing.
you want to go back to the time when you didn’t have to take pills for the things in your head
and the future was exciting instead of this gaping maw that moves expertly under your feet
so you know you’re going to have to step into it eventually
even when you keep your eyes on the ground.
you’ll slip up and go tumbling.

viii.
aunts, friends, teachers, ask you about your plans after high school
and you put on the smile you’ve never got around to practicing in the mirror
and say you’re thinking about it.

"

— 'seventeen in 2014,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

Tags: Poetry words
Quote
"do you dare me?"

— an ancient proverb meaning “I want to do this ridiculous thing that is likely to have bad consequences but if it goes badly I want to be able to blame literally anybody else but myself and frankly you’ll do” (via dajo42)

(via larryfondlinson)